The Heritage Foundation of Williamson County received commendations from both the Tennessee Historical Commission and the National Trust for Historic Preservation regarding plans for the Franklin Grove Estate and Gardens site. A space that aims to be a haven for culture, history, arts, education, and entrepreneurship, Franklin Grove combines the perfect juxtaposition between honoring our shared heritage and offering opportunities for visionary growth through adaptive re-use.

According to TN Historical Commission Executive Director E. Patrick McIntyre, adaptive re-use is “key to sustainability for our time-honored historic places.” Rob Nieweg, Vice President of Preservation Services and Outreach at the National Trust for Historic Preservation applauded this best practice in historical preservation citing that it offers properties “productive new uses and strengthens communities.”

He adds, “From the Heritage Foundation’s plan, we see that the Foundation is taking the initiative to restore and repurpose this long-vacant complex of historically significant buildings, a remarkable investment in the future of downtown Franklin. Woven throughout this project is a commitment to telling the full history of the site and the local community, creating a place that is vibrant, authentic, and welcoming to all.”

In addition to bolstering historical, inclusive, and economic values, Neiweg cites properties such as Franklin Grove can improve the future vitality of historic Franklin due to the fact that “underutilized properties tend to wither and die, undermining adjacent neighborhoods.”

These esteemed remarks further illustrate The Heritage Foundation’s commitment to thoroughly ensuring the Franklin Grove development adheres to high historical preservation standards and demonstrating transparency as it solicits valuable feedback through the planning process. To learn more about Franklin Grove and how to become an ambassador, visit our page here.

Read E. Patrick McIntyre Jr.’s (Tennessee Historical Commission) letter here >

Read Rob Nieweg’s (National Trust for Historic Preservation) letter here >